Blog

February 6, 2020
Serving the Community: How Avid4 Adventure CEO Partners with Non Profits
For so many reasons, I am grateful to work with Avid4 Adventure. For example, I am lucky that Avid4’s mission aligns with my own personal beliefs, and I am lucky that my work at Avid4 directly results in positive changes in the world . So, I know that my job not only supports my professional goals, but also helps to support my community service goals. However, I also know that I should be giving more; I should be finding ways to compliment my work at Avid4 Adventure by being of service in other ways. I should be finding more opportunities to “throw something back.”
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Topics: Public Lands Inclusivity Live Community Sustainability

December 17, 2019
From Cautious to Confident: Secrets to Encouraging Even the Most Wary Child

“Being introverted is not something to outgrow; it is something to accept and grow into—and even to cherish.” - Susan Cain

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Topics: Skills Learned at Summer Camp Inclusivity Overcoming Fear

September 23, 2019
Supporting Kids With Disabilities at Summer Camp

When you look at the Avid4 Adventure website you’ll be presented with images of happy, healthy, adventurous children on every page. For most parents and guardians, those three words are a simple, all-encompassing description of what they want for their kiddos at summer camp and beyond. Happy. Healthy. Adventurous.

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Topics: Inclusivity

August 23, 2019
How to Start a Conversation About Inclusive Language with Your Child
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Topics: Inclusivity

July 22, 2019
Looking Beyond Fun: Feeling Included is What Really Matters to Kids

Looking Beyond Fun: Feeling Included is What Really Matters to Kids

When parents decide to sign up their kiddos for a week of summer camp, their heads are likely filled with images of their child scaling a rock climbing route, triumphantly paddling a kayak all by themselves, and, most importantly, coming home exhausted and happy five days in a row. Cultivating a culture of inclusivity is probably not the first skill that comes to mind at registration. And yes, I’m using the word skill here because the comprehension and practice of this type of social capability is not completely innate. Sure, some kids might have a natural talent for making others feel welcome in a group the same way some kids might be able to ride a bike without training wheels on the first day, but each skill begins with a lesson and is developed with practice. This is where the Respect PONY comes in.

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Topics: Diversity in the outdoors Inclusivity